Keila-Joa Waterfall

RMK is an organisation responsible for the upkeep and general preservation of Estonian state-owned forests. With over 2.2 million hectares of forest covering the land (40% of which is owned by the state) this is no small task. more “Keila-Joa Waterfall”

How a Tiny Deer gave Tallinn its Name

There are many different legends offering explanations as to how the Estonian capital got its name but one of the most popular stories is set around the time of the Danish King Valdemar.

Shortly after the King and his forces had conquered North Estonia and converted the population to Christianity the king was taking a stroll in his new grounds. In the upper quarters of the town he spied a tiny deer. Rather than hunt the animal, the new king ordered his courtiers to find and capture the animal so the king could keep him as a pet. more “How a Tiny Deer gave Tallinn its Name”

Summer Cycling: Reminiscing

Cycling is undoubtedly the most liberating and efficient way to explore Tallinn. With numerous cycle paths and amazing natural scenery, a bike is almost as essential as a camera… maps are optional.

This gorgeous forest is located on Rummu tee (near Pirita), a short ride from the TV Tower. Notice the quaint, yet slightly eerie, cemetary on the right hand side of the path. Very Interesting. more “Summer Cycling: Reminiscing”

Stalked: Abandoned Mansion, Riisipere

About 50km from Tallinn lies the small town of Riisipere. After a lengthy bike ride we came face to face with this magnificent yet eerie mansion. Dating back to the 1800’s, the building and its grounds have been completely abandoned and left to the mercy of the elements for many years, giving this once grand structure a far more imposing aura.

I have often heard the phrase ‘a wall of silence’ used to describe a stillness so profound that it feels all-consuming. The grounds of Riisipere Mansion were engulfed by silence. No birdsong. No breeze. No rustling of the leaves. No life could be heard. Gardens were overgrown and a solitary rusting bench lay forgotten next to a vast lake that stretched out into the void. more “Stalked: Abandoned Mansion, Riisipere”

The Russian Market

Tallinn boasts many clean, shiny and sterile shopping centres packed with the typical array of vastly over-priced clothing stores, chain restaurants and miserable faces but for a truly unique experience nowhere compares to the Russian market.

From second hand socks to chunks of raw meat, antique cameras, stuffed eagles and a staggering array of old Soviet knives and Nazi uniforms, the Russian market is the place to find almost anything your heart desires. So, step into the time machine and travel back to the Soviet times with a visit to this fascinating cultural locale. more “The Russian Market”

Abandoned Prison: Patarei

The imposing abandoned structure of Patarei Prison, just a stones throw from the main harbour, serves as a stark reminder of the brutality of the Soviet regime and offers a tantalising glimpse into the grim nature of prison life in Estonia during the late twentieth century.

Originally built as a sea fortress in 1840, this formidable compound housed inmates right up until 2004 and has remained almost completely untouched since its closure in 2006. With dead plants still on the tables, beds still made and bars of soap decaying in the showers, this eerie, uncomfortable and dirty place remains one of the most ubiquitous remnants of Tallinn’s dark past. Poignant, thought-provoking and utterly immersive. more “Abandoned Prison: Patarei”

Linda Hill (Lindamägi)

At the top of Toompea Street on the upper side of the Old Town sits a tiny monument depicting a mythical figure – Linda. According to Tallinn folklore, Linda was the wife of Kalev, the man who founded the city. The statue depicts a very solemn figure of Linda with her head bowed, mourning the death of her husband.

This small monument is very important to the people of Tallinn because, despite the fact that the statue predates World War II, the residents adopted it as an unofficial memorial to loved ones that had been exiled to Siberia. Due to the fact that there was no official gravesite or memorial, locals would come and lay flowers by Linda, sometimes at great personal risk. more “Linda Hill (Lindamägi)”