Dalai Lama Speech in Freedom Square

Back in 2011, thousands of people flock to Freedom Square to hear a speech from the Dalai Lama, who was on a tour of the Baltic region at the time. This image, taken from the hill overlooking the vast square, really gave a sense of scale. So many people standing in silence just to hear one man speak.

As Estonia continues to stride purposefully into the twenty first century such high profile visits serve primarily to cement the ever-growing reputation of this tiny Baltic country as a forward-facing and progressive nation. The glistening freedom monument towering proudly behind the Dalai Lama perfectly encapsulates this journey from Cold War oppression to self-determined destiny. more “Dalai Lama Speech in Freedom Square”

Patarei Vangla: Abandoned Soviet Prison not fit for Humans

The imposing abandoned structure of Patarei Prison, just a stones throw from the main harbour, serves as a stark reminder of the brutality of the Soviet regime and offers a tantalising glimpse into the grim nature of prison life in Estonia during the late twentieth century.

Originally built as a sea fortress in 1840, this formidable compound housed inmates right up until 2004 and has remained almost completely untouched since its closure in 2006. With dead plants still on the tables, beds still made and bars of soap decaying in the showers, this eerie, uncomfortable and dirty place remains one of the most ubiquitous remnants of Tallinn’s dark past. Poignant, thought-provoking and utterly immersive. more “Patarei Vangla: Abandoned Soviet Prison not fit for Humans”

Linda Hill (Lindamägi)

At the top of Toompea Street on the upper side of the Old Town sits a tiny monument depicting a mythical figure – Linda. According to Tallinn folklore, Linda was the wife of Kalev, the man who founded the city. The statue depicts a very solemn figure of Linda with her head bowed, mourning the death of her husband.

This small monument is very important to the people of Tallinn because, despite the fact that the statue predates World War II, the residents adopted it as an unofficial memorial to loved ones that had been exiled to Siberia. Due to the fact that there was no official gravesite or memorial, locals would come and lay flowers by Linda, sometimes at great personal risk. more “Linda Hill (Lindamägi)”